Azure Development Tip: Toggle Where You Get Config in Application_Start()

The Azure Development Fabric is quite useful as far as simulating Azure on your dev box, It is especially nice how it simulates mulitple web roles and worker roles, so you can find web farm problems and what not before deploying. But, one hassle when working in the dev fabric is that once you start debugging, it creates a package and "deploys" the files, so that you can't make any [Read More]

Beware of Using Memory Storage With The ASP.NET Chart Control In Windows Azure With Multiple Instances of Your WebRole

In the documentation here: http://blogs.msdn.com/deliant/archive/2008/12/02/managing-chart-generated-images-with-chart-image-handler.aspx on the ASP.NET Chart Controls, it states: Do not use this [the memory storage] option in a server cluster or a multiple-process site. Well, if you have multiple instances of your web role in Windows Azure, this is gonna get you.  It got me. But hats off to the Windows Azure [Read More]

Putting Files at the Root of Blog Storage in Windows Azure

Just learned today that by default you can't store files at the root in Windows Azure storage. So, what if you have http://foo.blob.core.windows.net which you've mapped to http://blob.foo.com and you want to put a file so that it resolves to to http://blob.foo.com/bar.png? Well you can create a special container called $root, which will map to the root. [Read More]

Critical Hot Fix for Using Silverlight, WCF and Windows Azure

I innocently added a Silverlight-enable WCF Service to my Azure application and then innocently generated a Service Reference for my Silverlight client. Everything worked fine on my machine; nothing worked once I uploaded it to Azure.  After going down a lot of wrong turns in figuring out what was wrong, I was able to use Fiddler to discover the following response from the service: The message with To 'http: [Read More]

The Importance of Using CNames with Windows Azure

I recently had to move an Azure service from one account to another.  Unfortunately, they could not migrate my account, which meant that I manually had to migrate it.  In the case of the service, I had created a cname {name}.mysite.com that pointed to the Azure DNS name ({name}.cloudapp.net).  Lucky me: I was able to migrate the service and then repoint the CName [Read More]